Phoenix Snake Removal

Safe & Humane Snake Removal in Phoenix, Arizona HOTLINE: 480-237-9975
Feb
22nd
2012

Another Gophersnake Capture from Ahwatukee

The second snake capture of 2012 is another gophersnake, caught in the 85048 zip code of Phoenix (Ahwatukee) by Eric. It was caught and released back to the desert. The season has started!

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Feb
11th
2012

First Snake Removal of 2012

Nick went out on Thursday to catch the first snake of the year in Phoenix; a beautiful, adult gophersnake from the area around Camelback mountain (called in as a rattlesnake). Since then there have been a few more calls, so snakes are starting to get out into the world a little with our current warm weather.

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Feb
4th
2012

Captive Rattlesnake Goes Back to the Wild

We got a call to remove this rattlesnake that a man had captured some time ago from a location we are very familiar with. After digging the poor snake out of it’s winter den, he’s spent a few days in a warm room before heading back to the exact spot he was originally captured from.

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Feb
1st
2012

Snake Removal in Wickenburg!

We are now servicing the Wickenburg area, including snake removal services to Sun City, Surprise, and areas in between. Rattlesnakes are very common all throughout the area, and encounters are common. Take down the number and call 928-328-1603 for fast snake control.

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Jan
11th
2012

Some more captures from 2011 – Gophersnakes

About a third of all rattlesnakes we get called out to catch end up being harmless gophersnakes. They do a pretty good rattlesnake impresstion, puffing up, hissing, and putting on quite a show. They even rattle their striped tails, which can seem very rattle-like to those who don’t know better.

They are of course harmless, and actually great to have around the yard. They’re very active, general predators, and are quite a lot of competition for resources.

Here’s one on a porch in Paradise Valley.

Here’s Brad holding another that he’s caught.

… and another.

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Dec
17th
2011

Winter Rattlesnake Activity

Something about the recent rain and slightly warmer temperatures of the last couple of days has caused at least a small portion of the rattlesnake population to become semi-active. We received three calls today.
Here’s a small Diamondback that Kelly removed from a home in Scottdale this evening.

Something about the recent rain and slightly warmer temperatures of the last couple of days has caused at least a small portion of the rattlesnake population to become semi-active. We received three calls today.

Here’s a small Diamondback that Kelly removed from a home in Scottdale this evening.

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Dec
3rd
2011

Baby Rattlesnakes Active in the Winter – Caught in Window Pitfall

Here’s an unintended pitfall trap that is a common situation around homes. Kelly went to remove a baby rattlesnake that had fallen into a window recess, and found a number of other dead animals that weren’t so lucky.
Even though it’s cold out, continue to be safe and watchful in the yard. On warm days, rattlesnakes will often take the opportunity to get a little sunshine.

Here’s an unintended pitfall trap that is a common situation around homes. Kelly went to remove a baby rattlesnake that had fallen into a window recess, and found a number of other dead animals that weren’t so lucky.
Even though it’s cold out, continue to be safe and watchful in the yard. On warm days, rattlesnakes will often take the opportunity to get a little sunshine.

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Nov
19th
2011

Winter is here: still watch out for rattlesnakes in your yard

Winter is here, but snakes are still to be found. Even though they’re trying to get out of the cold, they will still turn up from time to time if their chosen den site is disturbed. A great example: this diamondback Kelly caught today in Cave Creek. Skinny and old, we’re hoping he can find someplace better to wait out the winter.

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Sep
11th
2011

Renter’s Insurance & Snake Owners

An article about renters insurance for those who keep pet reptiles, with a quote or two from me, and a photo of our little Mexican hognosed snake.

The slippery insurance scenario for homeowners who own snakes

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Aug
14th
2011

Customer Video: Diamondback on the Porch

Here’s a short video of Brad catching a small diamondback in Mesa, in the 85207 zip code.

See the video

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Jul
26th
2011

Two Gophersnakes from Paradise Valley

These two were found hiding behind some flowerpots, and relocated a distance away to Camelback mountain. While they were being released, one got defensive, and I used my hat to show how good their angry-snake impression is.

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Jul
22nd
2011

Owning Snakes and Home Insurance

The slippery insurance scenario for homeowners who own snakes
Nick DiUlio

When thinking about buying home insurance, the average consumer probably considers such matters as structural integrity, flood potential and maybe even the possibility of a tornado touching down in the neighborhood. He probably doesn’t think about snakes, even though owning one can affect whether his home is covered.

Consider Bryan Hughes of Arizona. As a snake owner who works professionally with numerous species of the slithery reptiles, Hughes says he has been denied home insurance and renter’s insurance several times.

“It was quite unexpected,” Hughes says of the first time he was denied coverage. “The rules are, of course, there to rule out any potentially dangerous animal. But almost all of the snakes kept by casual owners cannot cause more harm than a few cuts, and that’s only if they’re particularly mean.”

… Full story: The Slippery Insurance Scenario for Homeowners Who Own Snakes.

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Jul
20th
2011

A Pair of Speckled Rattlesnakes Removed From a North Phoenix Pool Area

Jon responded to a call to remove a rattlesnake from the pool housing at a home in the Carefree highway and I-17 area, and found a second rattlesnake there as well! The speckled rattlers from the area are a beautiful orange color, like the iron-rich rock they prefer to live on. This is a snake that you’ll only see if you live very close to mountainous areas.

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Jul
19th
2011

Diamondbacks Relocated from Peoria

Here’s another rattlesnake caught and removed from a home in Peoria, Arizona by Eric.

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Jul
13th
2011

A Diamondback Captured in Ahwatukee

The first rattlesnake captured by Paul; this guy is pretty typical in size and coloration for the area. Rescued in Ahwatukee and relocated to the desert.

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Jul
12th
2011

A Couple of Common, Harmless Snakes From Valley

Eric removed these two harmless snakes today. These species are very common throughout the suburbs and even further into the city, living on crickets and scorpions. Neither will ever even bite, and reach a maximum length of about a foot long.

The fist is the banded variety of the sonoran groundsnake, which was captured under a door threshold in the 85022 zip code in Phoenix. This species is quite commonly mistaken to be a coralsnake.

This is a desert nightsnake, often mistaken to be a baby rattlesnake by home owners who find them inside the house. This one was removed from a home on the North side of South Mountain.

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Jul
7th
2011

A Young Mojave Rattlesnake From a Mesa Backyard

A home owner discovered this little mojave rattling at her dogs late last night in the x zip code. Eric ran out at about 1am to catch it and find a new home in the desert. The monsoons are bringing rattlesnake activity to all hours of the night.

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Jul
6th
2011

Rattlesnake Removed From a Scottsdale Yard

Written by Rick Schultz

We received a call from a customer in Scottsdale who stated that her cats had found a snake in a planter beside her house. We responded to the call and were shown a pretty harmless looking planter.

The customer had not seen the snake in a while but had a photo of it under the plant to help me identify if. It was a pretty large Western Diamondback.

I walked around the house and gained access to the planter which was  filled with large rocks. These rocks were providing the snake with a place. I could ear it rattling, but could not see it. Finally I located the snake!

I was able to flip a few rock out of the way while the customer stood behind the glass and safely took these photos of me as I removed the snake.

I finally removed the Diamondback safely and got him into the bucket so he could be safely relocated back into the desert. He was a very pretty! He was safely relocated about 100 yards east in the desert.

When you run into a rattlesnake on your property please call a professional to remove it! We will be happy to respond and help you 24 hours a day.

If you or someone you know lives where snakes do, write down this number: 480-237-9975

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Jun
27th
2011

Diamondback from 65th ave and Happy Valley Area

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Jun
26th
2011

Sunday Morning Rattlesnakes

Despite the ridiculously hot temperatures in the Valley, Sunday morning came with a couple of rattlesnake sightings in backyards.

The first was this young diamondback from the 85083 zip code, around Happy Valley and 51st Avenue. Please excuse the messy bucket, the last snake I put in there was a mud-covered gophersnake and I didn’t get a chance to clean it out. He didn’t mind. :)

Here’s a photo from Eric’s much, much cleaner bucket with a Mojave rattlesnake he captured at a Goodyear home about an hour later.

As always, both were released unharmed back to the desert, to hopefully never see another human.

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Jun
23rd
2011

California Kingsnake

Here’s a nice looking kingsnake that Eric caught in the 85028 zip code. We don’t see them much at homes, but they do occur just about anywhere in the valley.

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Jun
21st
2011

Snake Removal and Rattlesnake Control in Mesa, Apache Junction, and the Entire East Valley

I’m pleased to announce our expansion into the East Valley locations near Phoenix. To make sure that the information is current and relevant only to snakes in the Mesa area, we’ve launched a new website for anyone who needs immediate rattlesnake removal.

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Jun
18th
2011

A Few Stragglers Out In The Heat

This time of year is quite slow for activity. Snakes don’t like it being this hot and dry either, and do what anyone in their right mind should be doing; wait it out in cooler quarters. This morning was a bit of a surprise, with three calls.

The first relocation call came in from Scottsdale, where a diamondback rattlesnake was sleeping in behind a hose dispenser. She was relocated to a desert wash after getting a drink of water. Like a lot of rattlesnakes caught sleeping like this, she didn’t make a peep until being released. Here’s her parting shot as she crawled into a new hiding spot.

The next call was a medium sized gophersnake, from South Phoenix. The home owner followed it until it went down a rodent hole, where I was able to convince it to come out after a few minutes. He was relocated to the rocks of South Mountain.

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Jun
14th
2011

Speckled Rattlesnake Removed from a Home in the Middle of Phoenix

Rick caught this red speckled rattlesnake today in the 85020 zip code of Phoenix. It’s a young speckled rattlesnake, originally seen in the front porch area, and found coiled up near the hot tub in the back of the house. These aren’t as common to find as diamondbacks, so it’s always a treat to get one safely back to the wild.

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May
31st
2011

Memorial Day Rattlesnakes

Over the memorial day weekend, I caught a few BBQ crashers:

1 Speckled rattlesnake and 1 Diamondback in Anthem

1 big Diamondback in the Cave Creek & Pinnacle Peak area, who had just eaten a rabbit

1 diamondback in Cave Creek, hiding out in the garage.

I also performed an inspection in prime speckled rattlesnake habitat to try and find out why the home owner was seeing so many snakes. We found the likely problem, and found a little ground snake crawling around that was released at the homeowner’s doorstep (at her suggestion) to continue eating scorpions.

The windy cool temperatures of the last week have kept most snakes down, but as things get warmer, night time activity will increase. Watch your step!

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