Phoenix Snake Removal

Safe & Humane Snake Removal in Phoenix, Arizona HOTLINE: 480-237-9975
Mar
2nd
2016

Extending Service Area – Tucson Snake Removal and Rattlesnake Fencing

Rattlesnake Solutions is happy to announce that we have expanded into the Tucson, Marana, Oro Valley, and surrounding areas. Snake control and management of wildlife services is an important part of the communities that border wild areas. Home owners in the Tucson area frequently encounter rattlesnakes on property or other species of snakes in their yard, and we now offer immediate snake removal services throughout the Tucson metro area.

For 24 hour snake control service in Tucson, call 520-308-6211. Or visit us online at tucsonsnakeremoval.com

An interesting part of this expansion will the the possibility of new rattlesnake species that we have not had a chance to work with in the Phoenix area. Near Tucson, the distribution of habitat, along with proximity to the sky islands region of Arizona, means that alongside the usual Western Diamondback Rattlesnakes and Mojave Rattlesnakes, there is an increased possibility to relocate Arizona Black Rattlesnakes, Blacktailed Rattlesnakes (only a handful have ever been relocated in the Phoenix area), or even protected species such as the Banded Rock Rattlesnake. We are very much looking forward to seeing what turns up in Tucson area yards.

Keeping Snakes Away from Your Yard Since 2014

Our snake fence service has already been in Tucson for a few years, with expanded service to all areas of the Tucson metro region. A Rattlesnake Solutions snake fence is a physical barrier to protect your yard from rattlesnakes, to create a safe area for you and your family. For more information, photos, pricing, and details about the snake fence service, please visit http://www.tucsonsnakefence.com.

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Oct
14th
2014

Rattlesnake Fact & Fiction

We’re working on some new displays for our education booth. Here’s a new one, dispelling some of the most common things we hear on social media sites.

Rattlesnakes Fact and Fiction

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Jul
30th
2014

Releasing a Western Diamondback

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Jul
23rd
2014

Recent Snake Removals in Phoenix and Scottsdale

It’s been a busy year so far! We’re running calls to catch and relocate rattlesnakes (and other harmless varieties) all around the valley, day and night. As the rain comes in, snakes become more active at night and are often encountered late in the evening, or out on the porch in the early morning sun.

Snakes like this Western Diamondback Rattlesnake are just looking to stay out of the sun.

Rattlesnake on a Porch in Phoenix

Rattlesnake on a Porch in Phoenix

Rattlesnake on a porch

Rattlesnake on a porch

This gila monster was waiting out the summer heat in a garage.

Gila Monster

Gila Monster

This gophersnake has the same idea:

Gophersnake Hiding in the Shade

Gophersnake Hiding in the Shade

They’re relocated back to deep cover, to stay well out of the heat and sun, in their home range so they have the best chance of survival.

Rattlesnake Relocation

Rattlesnake Relocation

If you see a snake, don’t attempt to capture it; call us at 480-237-9975 for immediate snake relocation. We’re up all night, so don’t worry about waking is up; we’ll be there ASAP.

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May
30th
2014

Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake from South Mountain Moving Through Brush

I found this Speckled Rattlesnake on South Mountain in Phoenix, moving through an area I’ve seen him in before several times. Despite speckled rattlesnakes being quite common on South Mountain, they are usually unknown to residents of nearby neighborhoods due to extremely cryptic coloration and tendency to stay in the rocks.

Some of these individuals become quite predictable after repeated, non-invasive observation. During the Spring of 2013, I was able to follow this particular snake during different parts of the day and eventually learn daily habits enough to be able to find it at-will. Each undisturbed observation lead to further understanding of behavior, and applied elsewhere, being able to find more with that knowledge. This particular snake, in the many times I’ve seen it, has never rattled at me and has never considered me a threat. In 2014 I’ve only seen him once, in one of only 2 visits to the area, where he was once again on the move and crawled right past my feet without ever realizing I was there.

This species is one we commonly remove from yards in South Phoenix, along South Mountain; Ahwatukee, and Laveen. Other color phases occur elsewhere, but these blue ones are exciting to see.

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May
29th
2014

Sonoran Sidewinder Rattlesnake Moving

This little guy is a sidewinder, one of the most iconic snakes in the American Southwest. They’re a type of rattlesnake, which surprises some people. This is an adult, at about one and a half feet long.

This is a good example of defensive behavior that could be interpreted as aggression. The snake is out in the open and has no choice but to defend itself against me, the “predator”. If there were bushes or holes nearby, the snake would almost certainly try to get to them and hide. All I need to do is walk away, and I’m perfectly safe.

Sidewinders aren’t the most common snake in Phoenix, since they require sandy soil. They also tend to wander, so are quickly killed off in areas where roads create hazards. We do get calls to remove them in areas around West Phoenix, like Buckeye and Tonopah, and sometimes in the Southern part of Apache Junction

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Apr
29th
2014

Speckled Rattlesnake from Mummy Mountain in Paradise Valley

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Jun
26th
2013

Hot and Dry – Snakes Don’t Like It Any More Than You Do

This next weekend it is going to be hot. 117 for at least two days, and no water in sight. That means everyone will be headed indoors, including rattlesnakes.

This time of year, our calls are few and far between. Where we normally are running several per day, one a day will be more typical. Why is this? Snakes are simply trying to stay out of the heat and lay low until the monsoon rains come. That is weeks away, and rattlesnakes are left with few options but to get in deep, somewhere out of the sun, and wait it out. Similar to how some animals hibernate to deal with cold temperatures, rattlesnakes hide away during the brutal Arizona summer months and wait for rain.

Just because the snakes may be hiding, doesn’t mean you should stop keeping an eye out for them if you live where they do. A garage or door left open quickly becomes a cool cave for animals to hide in, and it is not uncommon to see rattlesnakes tucked away in the back storage areas or inside the pool house. As always, if you see one, leave it alone and call 480-237-9975 to have it safely removed.

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Mar
8th
2013

Spring is here, and so are the snakes.

We’ve had a nice, wet Spring so far, which will be great for local wildlife after the extremely dry conditions around here the last few years. Tonight we had only our second call of the year, a young gophersnake that found between a doorway and the front step of a home in North Phoenix. It was likely spending the winter under the house, and had come out a little to take advantage of the nice weather.

It of course did its best rattlesnake impression, rattling its tail and trying to look tough. It must have worked, because he’s been released elsewhere to grow up away from unsuspecting feet.

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Mar
1st
2013

How do you get a snake off a glue trap?

This is more common than you might expect in Arizona – a glue trap laid out for scorpions ends up with a scaly victim instead. We wrote a short article explaining how to let the snake go free without having to touch it or put yourself in danger, all with something everyone has around the house. Take a look:

Release a snake caught in a glue trap

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Jan
12th
2013

New Website – RattlesnakeSolutions.com

After a lot of hard work (and much more to come), we’ve launched a more formal website to focus more on the education and rattlesnake prevention side of things. In time, we will make this a hub of information for those of us living in areas where rattlesnakes can be found. While there will always be a lot of information about rattlesnakes themselves in their natural surroundings, we are looking forward to providing the largest resource there is for urban rattlesnake encounters to keep people and snakes alike safe.

Rattlesnake Solutions LLC – Snake Removal, Prevention, & Education for Arizona

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Sep
7th
2012

Baby Rattlesnakes! How to deal with them.

It’s that time of year! Mother rattlesnakes all over Arizona are having babies. With it comes a wave of visits by baby rattlesnakes, as they wander around trying to figure out their first month of life.

If you see a baby rattlesnake and want to make sure there aren’t others, call us any time at 480-327-9975.

First, I’ll address a common myth that gets passed around. Baby rattlesnakes are not more dangerous than adults. The myth goes a couple of different ways, the most common being that they are young and don’t “know how” to release the right amount of venom. Other than being false, this is inconsequential. It’s not just the toxicity of venom, but how much of it you get. The amount of venom that a baby rattlesnake can give at full-dose is a small fraction of what could be delivered by an adult.

Baby rattlesnakes are also smaller, meaning a much shorter strike range (just inches), and if you were to step on one with a shoe on, you’d more likely just squish the little thing. Try that with an adult, however, and you’re likely on your way to the emergency room. I must say the babies seem a little more likely to be defensive right away, though you can’t blame them! Everything eats them. Snakes, raccoons, bobcats, all kinds of birds, even fish and invertebrates from time to time.

They do have rattles, visible right from the start, but they don’t make any sound until they get a second segment, which is after the second shed skin. At first, it just sounds like an insect, so don’t rely on the rattle to give warning.

If you do see a tiny baby rattlesnake, chances are it was born nearby. I say ‘born’ because rattlesnakes give live birth, and along with that, the mother may stay with the babies for a short period of time after. When we go on a call to remove a baby, and it looks ‘new’, we will always search the rest of the property to see if there is a little pile of babies sitting nearby with mom. When we find them, they all go together to a new place to figure out life away from people.

The good news: if you see a baby rattlesnake, it’s not really that big of a deal. Unlike older rattlesnakes, a baby is more or less just wandering around, trying to figure out how to carve out it’s own piece of the desert to live in. For that reason, they get themselves into a lot of places where a snake that knows better wouldn’t. We’ve removed babies from inside homes, in the garage, all kinds of pump control boxes and poolhouses, and in conditions that an older snake wouldn’t ever be caught out in.

what a baby rattlesnake looks like

A mother diamondback and a few of her babies, caught and relocated by Eric.

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Sep
3rd
2012

24/7 Snake Removal – Scottsdale, Fountain Hills, & Cave Creek

3 years in, it’s apparent that the city of Scottsdale is where a rattlesnake is most likely to end up in your yard. Not all of it of course, but much of the area North of the 101, and East into Fountain Hills are places we visit often.

For 24/7 rapid response snake removal, call 480-237-9975.

The reason for this is simple – more Scottsdale yards are native desert, or back right up to desert habitat, than elsewhere in the valley. Much of the development is recent, and strict HOA guidelines keep habitat suitable for desert wildlife, including rattlesnakes.

Does this mean you are in danger, or you should avoid buying a house in Scottsdale? Absolutely not! A snake in the yard can be a dangerous situation, but it doesn’t have to be if you remember to respect the animal and take care of the basics. Those are:

  1. Keep the yard free of debris, as much as possible.
  2. Reduce resources – rodents, water, and places to hide.
  3. If you see a snake, leave it alone, and call an expert to relocate it.

In all of the people we’ve met who have had snakes removed from their property, we’ve learned that home owners who are friendly to wildlife do not lose any more dogs, kids, or livestock than those who kill them as they see them.

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

The most common snake we are called to catch in the valley.

Many of the snakes that we are called to catch in the Scottsdale area are harmless varieties – gophersnakes, kingsnakes, coachwhips, and house-seeking snakes such as the nightsnake and groundsnake. In almost all cases, anything that isn’t a rattlesnake is great to have around the house. Kingsnakes and coachwhips will actually eat a rattlesnake if they find one, and gophersnakes are always hungry; the best free pest control available. Seeing these snakes can also serve as a little reminder that you do live where native snakes can reach, and they are there for a reason; often a resource provided by the yard. Seeing one of these harmless snakes may be a good time to take preventative measures like having snake proof fencing installed, having your dog trained and vaccinated, and teaching yourself and your family about snakes in the area.

If you do see a snake that you’d like to be identified, email a photo to info@phoenixsnakeremoval.com, or text a photo to 480-694-3020. As part of our effort to keep people and snakes safe in peaceful coexistence, identification and answers to any questions you have about reptiles in Arizona are always available at no cost.

Gophersnake

This threat display is harmless, if you pay attention! A gophersnake may strike, hiss, and rattle its tail when it feels threatened, though this is all a show. A gophersnake is capable of biting, but if you are bitten by a gophersnake, you likely have earned it by picking it up!

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Jul
13th
2012

Finally, rain! Snakes are also thankful.

With all the rain yesterday, the only real rain the valley has had since December (there was that little spat on the 4th of July, but it was steam by mid morning the next day), and possibly the best storm in years, snakes are on the move!

Unlike how it is often reported by local news around the country, hotter doesn’t mean better when it comes to snakes. They prefer temperatures to be in the mid-80′s, which is where their body works most efficiently. High temperatures (110F) is usually fatal to a rattlesnake, and the ground outside is at least that hot by 8am most mornings in mid summer. Much of June and May have been nothing but hot and dry, and the snakes have been hiding, waiting for the rain to cool things off and get prey moving. They now have the next few months to eat all they can, find mates, have babies, and take care of much of the active part of their lives.

That means this time of year is when you are most likely to find a snake in your yard! Keep the garage closed, fences closed, double check that fencing around the yard for holes. Be extra vigilant in the early morning when leaving the house; it is common for snakes to lie coiled in entryways and sleep. Any gardening or yardwork should be done with caution; never put hands where you cannot see, and of course keep the yard as clean as possible. The first rule of snake safety still applies: if you see a snake, leave it alone!

This is one of the several snakes caught today, brought out by the rain; a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake caught in the East Valley by Rick.

If you or anyone you know has a snake that needs to be removed, call 480-237-9975 24 hours a day for immediate assistance.

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Jul
6th
2012

There’s a snake in my house. Is this a baby rattlesnake?

“I think this is a baby rattlesnake. We found it in our kitchen. Help!”

We get this email a lot, and calls even more. People throughout the Phoenix and Scottsdale area find small, patterned snakes with vertical pupils and triangular heads inside homes, and it’s almost always one species: the desert nightsnake.

I am not sure why this snake finds its way into homes more than others that seem much more likely to get inside, but they are. We have caught nightsnakes on bathroom counters, sinks, bathtubs, closets, and anywhere that pipes or other access can let a small snake in.

Rattlesnakes themselves very rarely are found inside homes. We do get a few a year, but the situation is usually the same: a door was left open for a few hours in the spring or fall. Rattlesnakes tend not to be as adaptable as other species, and would rather stay out in the yard than crawl around the carpet and underfoot of a busy household. Almost all of the rattlesnakes removed from indoor situations were in vacant or newly purchased homes where a door had been left open for a period of time. Night snakes, on the other hand, don’t seem to care! If there are spiders nearby, they want in.

To the inexperienced, they can certainly look like a small rattlesnake. Especially to those who have never seen a real rattlesnake before, or believe the falsehood that baby rattlesnakes have no rattle, the impression can be pretty good. When they are threatened, a nightsnake will coil tightly and flatten the head, looking even more like a rattler.

In all of the what must be hundreds of nightsnakes I have seen in homes and in the wild, not one has ever tried to bite. While technically, the nightsnake is slightly venomous, it could not possibly cause harm to any person, baby, dog, or cat. The toxin is suited for invertebrates like spiders and scorpions, which actually could pose some harm. This means that the best thing you can do if you see one in the pool or bathroom would be to scoop it up and put it outside, where it can continue to keep the bark scorpion and black widow population down.

If you need a snake to be removed in the Scottsdale or Phoenix area, or just have any questions, call us any time at 480-237-9975.

Here are some photos sent in just yesterday by someone who found one in a child’s room.

For comparison, this is what a baby rattlesnake looks like:

… a few more nightsnakes:

… and a few more baby rattlesnakes. See the difference?

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Jun
4th
2012

Watch your step in the morning! It’s time for rattlesnakes to share your porch.

Here’s a common sight this time of year. The heat and dry conditions are brutal on snakes, and they can get ‘stuck’ on porches and other shaded places when shrubs or other known hiding places are trimmed up. This diamondback was extremely skinny, dehydrated, and weak when captured. I gave him some water and found a better place for it to hide. Watch your step in the early mornings.

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May
18th
2012

Release of a young diamondback caught at the ebay building in Phoenix.

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May
4th
2012

A fat coachwhip ready for release

We got this young coachwhip with a meal in its belly from a home this Spring. They’re not dangerous snakes, but will always try to give you a bite if you pick them up.

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May
3rd
2012

Rattlesnake Relocated, 4-23-12

Another diamondback captured and released this Spring.

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May
2nd
2012

Diamondback Released

Another of Kelly’s recent captures, heading home.

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Apr
22nd
2012

Diamondback Release

Another diamondback going back into the wild.

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Apr
8th
2012

Diamondback relocated from the Phoenix mountains

In one of the older neighborhoods surrounding the Northern end of the Phoenix mountains, a home owner called in this diamondback. It was captured, given a drink of water, and relocated to more suitable habitat.

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Apr
5th
2012

A Pair of Diamondbacks from North Scottsdale

Eric went to catch one diamondback seen near a hot tub, and ended up finding a pair! Here they are, just before being released back into the desert.

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Mar
15th
2012

First Rattlesnake Catch of 2012 – Diamondback in a Scottsdale Garage

The year has started up, with 2 young diamondbacks over the weekend. Here’s a young rattlesnake caught in a garage, and released to a better place.

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Feb
22nd
2012

Another Gophersnake Capture from Ahwatukee

The second snake capture of 2012 is another gophersnake, caught in the 85048 zip code of Phoenix (Ahwatukee) by Eric. It was caught and released back to the desert. The season has started!

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